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Thanksgiving Safety

Thanksgiving Safety

The kitchen is the heart of the home, especially on Thanksgiving Day. Because Thanksgiving usually means lots of activity and people in the home, safety in the kitchen is important. The Garland Fire Department wants residents to consider the following safety tips to ensure a safe, injury-free holiday.

  • Stay in the kitchen when you are cooking on the stovetop so you can keep an eye on the food.
  • Stay in the home when cooking your turkey and check on it frequently.
  • Keep children away from the stove. The stove will be hot and kids should stay at least three feet away.
  • Make sure kids stay away from hot food and liquids. The steam or splash from vegetables, gravy or coffee could cause serious burns.
  • Have activities that keep kids out of the kitchen during this busy time. Games, puzzles or books can keep them busy. Kids can get involved in Thanksgiving preparations with recipes that can be done outside the kitchen.
  • Keep the floor clear so you don’t trip over kids, toys, pocketbooks or bags.
  • Keep knives out of the reach of children.
  • Be sure electric cords are not dangling off the counter within easy reach of a child.
  • Keep matches and utility lighters out of the reach of children—up high in a locked cabinet.
  • Never leave children alone in room with a lit candle.
  • Make sure your smoke alarms are working. Test them by pushing the test button.

Turkey Fryers – Not Worth the Risk

The National Fire Protection Association (NFPA) discourages the use of outdoor gas-fueled turkey fryers that cook the turkey in hot oil. The use of turkey fryers can lead to devastating burns, other injuries and the destruction of property.

  • Turkey fryers are often bumped or tipped over when the turkey is put in or taken out, presenting a greater risk for the oil to splash or spill. Outdoor fryers that come with a stand pose the greatest risk of tipping.
  • The oil is heated to such a high temperature for frying that the vapors could ignite, resulting in a fire.
  • If you use a turkey fryer during rain or snow, the risk of injury is increased. When rain or snow hits the hot oil, the oil can splash or turn to steam, which can cause burns.
  • Numerous fires have ignited when fryers were moved indoors or into a garage to keep the appliance out of the rain.
  • Moving the turkey from the fryer to a serving plate presents another chance of contact with hot oil.
  • Turkeys that are not completely thawed may cause the oil to splash, which can cause burns.

Those who prefer fried turkey are urged to look for grocery stores, specialty food stores and restaurants that sell deep fried turkeys that are already prepared. For your own safety, the NFPA urges you to refrain from using turkey fryers altogether.

Find more safety information resources at NFPA.org/education.